Ross Biko

23. I'm someone filled with selfbelif and hunted by selfdobut. Addicted to coffee, chocolated and the color pink.


Mi abuelo era un muñecote <3 #love #family

Mi abuelo era un muñecote <3 #love #family

Reblogueado desde zenpencils

Senos Culturales

Es muy común que entre las mujeres este esa idea de tener senos “bien formados y firmes”, pues según la estética popular así se ven “bonitos”. Esta creencia crea miles de complejos en millones de mujeres en cuanto a su cuerpo y es por ello que muchas odian ir a playas y piscinas o usar ropa muy ajustada porque realza la figura de su cuerpo y no les gusta. Yo opino que eso de “senos bien formados y firmes” es sólo una represión más con el cuerpo de la mujer. ¿Por qué mi cuerpo ha de ser feo si no encaja en esa cultura de masas? Así como nadie más tiene mis huellas dactilares nadie más tiene unos senos como los míos y es por ello que los considero, no solo bonitos, sino hermosos. No serán de esos senos redondos, ni estarán “parados”, pero son míos y de más nadie. Durante mucho tiempo tuve complejos con respecto a ellos pues nunca los tuve “parados”, y mi familia, particularmente mi madre, no ayudaba en el asunto pues siempre me criticaba el cuerpo y todas sus “fallas” pues según ella tenía el cuerpo, y la cito textualmente, de “una mujer paría”, es decir, de una mujer que ya ha tenido hijos. Siempre he tenido sobrepeso y eso ha ocasionado que mis medidas sean mucho más grandes de las que culturalmente se creen como “perfectas”, dicen que deben ser 90-60-90, osea 90cm en pechos, 60cm de cintura y 90cm de cadera, la última vez que me medí tenía 110cm de pechos, 95cm de cintura y 118cm de cadera, puede que no sean las medidas “normales” pero mi cuerpo está proporcionado de manera equilibrada, según como yo lo veo claro. No me avergüenzo de mis medidas ni me avergüenzo de pesar 94kilos, de lo único que me avergüenzo es de esa creencia cultural de mi propia sociedad de “ser flaco es ser bonito”, yo soy gorda y no me siento fea, me siento BELLA, no tengo exceso de peso, tengo exceso de BELLEZA, no tengo senos caídos, tengo senos HERMOSOS. Puede que todo esto suene muy egocéntrico, pero ¿que tiene de malo serlo sólo un poco? No me pienso doblegar a lo que culturalmente se acepta como “belleza”, sería admitir que no soy bella y que mi cuerpo es horrendo y necesita dieta, ejercicio y cirugías, NO, absolutamente NO. Quítense la ropa y mírense al espejo, tómense fotos y admiren su cuerpo, es hermoso así como está, tus senos son HERMOSOS así como están, sin importar si son caídos, si los pezones son asimétricos, si uno es más grande que el otro, si la aureola no es totalmente ronda, si son en “forma de tubo”, etc. Esos son tus senos y someterlos a un bisturí sería acabar con lo que te hace única, diferente, y original. No seas tonta y quiérete :)

This song has a really good message, I have always believed this, why sure I wear make up so everybody likes me? Al tho I put make up on almost everyday, is not in a “I-hate-my-face” way, I love my face, I just think that a cute pink lipstick and a little of mascara on my lashes makes my lips and my eyes a focal spot on my face. I do use make up BUT not like Colbie at the begging of the video xD

Reblogueado desde comicsalliance
comicsalliance:

NOSTALGIA AS A WEAPON: THE SAILOR MOON RENAISSANCE IS A FEMINIST MISSION BEHIND THE LINES OF POP CULTURE
By Juliet Kahn
Sailor Moon did not enter my life so much as consume it. I was eight, and in the space of a few weeks I learned all the attack names, bought the first two issues of the manga, went through three different understandings of how to pronounce “Takeuchi”, and developed a tiered list of my favorite characters.

I spent hours spelunking the MIDI-laden cave that was Geocities, learning the language of dub-versus-sub wars, exploring webrings, indulging in awful pidgin Japanese, and realizing that I was not actually the only person in the world that loved this show. I filled the drawer of my nightstand with printouts of art book pages (I never did anything with them, but they were the most beautiful things I had ever seen and I needed to possess them somehow). I scraped up a special outfit — a white turtleneck and blue pleated skirt, with my hair in pigtails — just to wear while watching the show.

Opinions crowded my head, the first ones I’d ever really developed on my own: on translation choices, best and worst story arcs, ideal romantic pairings. I didn’t just write Sailor Moon fanfiction — I wrote Sailor Moon poetry. It was, by far, the most vivid and vital part of those last few playground years.

Today, Sailor Moon is inescapable. There’s the new anime of course, and the new musicals, the merchandise, and the retranslation of the manga. But it’s the emblem of a wider renaissance as well, a resurgence of love for mahou shoujo, or magical girl anime and manga — a movement led by women well out of their childhood years.

A quick stroll through Tumblr reveals Sailor Moon cupcakes, punky Sailor Moon jackets, heartfelt essays about what the portrayal of lesbianism in Sailor Moon meant to the reader, dozens of artists working together to reanimate an episode of the anime, Sailor Moon nail art tutorials, cats named Luna, Beryl, Haruka and everything in between, hand-sculpted figurines, ornate embroidery projects, and an endless avalanche of fanart. Sailor Moon as an Adventure Time character. Sailor Moon cheekily clutching a Hitachi Magic Wand. Sailor Moon as a vicious biker chick. Sailor Moon protesting the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby ruling.

Sailor Moon fans have not so much rediscovered their love for Naoko Takeuchi’s sword-and-sparkle epic as they have elected her queen mother of their imaginations and ultimate aspirational self. She is, simultaneously, symbol, cause, and leader.

READ MORE

comicsalliance:

NOSTALGIA AS A WEAPON: THE SAILOR MOON RENAISSANCE IS A FEMINIST MISSION BEHIND THE LINES OF POP CULTURE

By Juliet Kahn

Sailor Moon did not enter my life so much as consume it. I was eight, and in the space of a few weeks I learned all the attack names, bought the first two issues of the manga, went through three different understandings of how to pronounce “Takeuchi”, and developed a tiered list of my favorite characters.

I spent hours spelunking the MIDI-laden cave that was Geocities, learning the language of dub-versus-sub wars, exploring webrings, indulging in awful pidgin Japanese, and realizing that I was not actually the only person in the world that loved this show. I filled the drawer of my nightstand with printouts of art book pages (I never did anything with them, but they were the most beautiful things I had ever seen and I needed to possess them somehow). I scraped up a special outfit — a white turtleneck and blue pleated skirt, with my hair in pigtails — just to wear while watching the show.

Opinions crowded my head, the first ones I’d ever really developed on my own: on translation choices, best and worst story arcs, ideal romantic pairings. I didn’t just write Sailor Moon fanfiction — I wrote Sailor Moon poetry. It was, by far, the most vivid and vital part of those last few playground years.

Today, Sailor Moon is inescapable. There’s the new anime of course, and the new musicals, the merchandise, and the retranslation of the manga. But it’s the emblem of a wider renaissance as well, a resurgence of love for mahou shoujo, or magical girl anime and manga — a movement led by women well out of their childhood years.

A quick stroll through Tumblr reveals Sailor Moon cupcakes, punky Sailor Moon jackets, heartfelt essays about what the portrayal of lesbianism in Sailor Moon meant to the reader, dozens of artists working together to reanimate an episode of the anime, Sailor Moon nail art tutorials, cats named Luna, Beryl, Haruka and everything in between, hand-sculpted figurines, ornate embroidery projects, and an endless avalanche of fanart. Sailor Moon as an Adventure Time character. Sailor Moon cheekily clutching a Hitachi Magic Wand. Sailor Moon as a vicious biker chick. Sailor Moon protesting the Supreme Court’s Hobby Lobby ruling.

Sailor Moon fans have not so much rediscovered their love for Naoko Takeuchi’s sword-and-sparkle epic as they have elected her queen mother of their imaginations and ultimate aspirational self. She is, simultaneously, symbol, cause, and leader.

READ MORE

Last one, I promise xD #color #colorballs

Last one, I promise xD #color #colorballs

Colorballs &lt;3 #color #colorballs

Colorballs <3 #color #colorballs

My colorballs hearings (not everything I own is pink xD) #color #colorballs

My colorballs hearings (not everything I own is pink xD) #color #colorballs

The rest of my pink hearings #pink #lovepink

The rest of my pink hearings #pink #lovepink

Some of my pink hearings &lt;3 #pink #lovepink

Some of my pink hearings <3 #pink #lovepink